Chutney ~ relishing food with a zing

“Is chutney a savoury jam, or is jam a sweet chutney?”

The answer according to New Zealand foodwriter, the late Digby Law on page 11 of his Pickle and Chutney Cookbook (reprinted in 1992), my go-to recipe book for many years, is that chutney is a savoury jam. Chutneys, cooked or uncooked, savoury or sweet, add great flavour bursts to many dishes.

Earlier this morning, while it was still cool enough to work in the kitchen, I processed  ripe tomatoes picked last night to make Tomato Chutney using a tried and true recipe. Himself thinks it “smells good”. When preparing tomatoes, I always scald the fruit with boiling water and remove the skins. I used white sugar, which gives the chutney a lighter colour, simply because I had no brown sugar in my pantry.

Overnight it seemed, the cucumbers became my new garden triffids, too big to make dill pickles.  Flip to page 30 of Law’s cookbook and I note I can use 3kg of peeled cucumbers to make a light, refreshing chutney. Vegetables are now salted and standing in a glass bowl until tomorrow.

Cucumber Chutney recipe

Meanwhile, back in the garden, the Mangere Pole beans were soaking up the morning sunshine after drinking up lots of rain yesterday. About midday, I picked one bucket load. Back in the kitchen, the beans were topped ‘n tailed, sliced, blanched in boiling water, drained, plunged into cold water, drained, dried, sealed in large, labelled ziplock plastic bags then put into the freezer 30 minutes after being picked.

How fresh is this?

 

 

 

 

Nature Makes Food Delicious ~ quote

“If you do not try to make food delicious, you will find that nature has made it so.”

Tonight at the dinner table as we enjoyed the crispness of tasty steamed green Mangere Pole beans  and flavoursome, vivid blue, heritage Maori potatoes freshly picked from the garden, I realised the truth of Masanobu Fukuoka’s words.

My life is richer for being able to chat over the blogging community garden fences and to swap cooking tips in bloggers’ kitchens as they cook. Anything I know is because others have generously shared their wisdom or resources. Bill Mollison considers that

We’re only truly secure when we can look out our kitchen window and see our food growing and our friends working nearby.

Nā tō rourou, nā taku rourou ka ora ai te iwi  With your food basket and my food basket the people will thrive  http://www.maori.cl/Proverbs.htm

 

This is my third challenge post. Thank you Carol  for nominating me for a three-day quote challenge. Please check out Carol’s Food For Thought post at https://cookingforthetimechallenged.wordpress.com

In the fun spirit of voluntary participation of the challenge, nominees may choose to

  • Post for three consecutive days
  • Posts can be one or three quotes per day
  • Nominate three different blogs per day

Please check out these great blogs I follow

Waste-Less Living

Sustainable in Holdfast Bay

Tastes of Life