My Garden ~ a Kiwi's take on life

Life is a lot like a garden


Carve on Tablets of Stone

Alphabet writing inspiration is not happening easily in this summer heat and humidity. It has become quite the daily challenge. The tablet technology before me has morphed into a tablet of stone. I tap away at the keyboard in an attempt to craft words into some semblance of a meaningful sentence.  

I wonder. Did the earliest writers, chisels in hand, ever feel as challenged by the need to carve coherent cuneiform and hieroglyphic content onto their stone tablets?


During our time in Egypt, we were fascinated by the myriad of stories of ancient Egypt as depicted by hieroglyphs.

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Winsome Boys

It’s not easy to be crafty and winsome at the same time, and few accomplish it after the age of six.  John W. Gardner

The next generation has gone camping – somewhere. No texts. No messages. X-Box is still at home. Son and Grandsons have not come home. Himself and I like to think they have inherited our hardy genetic predisposition to tough things out. This is a great summer holiday adventure for the Dad and his three lads. The two younger boys are delightful and winsome in their childlike excitement about the adventure.

In a few weeks, 12-year old Geeky Grandson will enter male adolescence. The Boys’ High School claims to prepare boys to become fine young men. Fine men who care, who are respectful, who take responsibility for their actions and their words, who  serve their communities with honour. This now pre-teen boy-child, fretting for his X-Box, is amusing, charming, intelligent and  pleasant. This soon-to-be teenager will follow in his two adolescent cousins’ footsteps at Boys’ High. There, he will engage with new adults and peers. His winsome ways will smooth his path through and beyond his schooldays.

His eldest cousin, 19-year old Grandson, home from his first year at university, is showing the way of having perfected the craft of crashing onto the couch, asleep after a hard night out. Another charming teenager  in the here-and-now cruise control mode. Family matters. Mates matter more. Social scene matters very much. His academic break job is a necessity to keep his car fuelled and as in the way of living life to the fullest. For now, his Dad, Number 1 Son, and Daughter-in-law are accommodating their young man-boy with the echoes of childlike charm and his engaging winsome ways.    



Summer Storm

The massive, severe, subtropical weather system that battered much of New Zealand has abated.

All through Thursday night and during Friday the wind howled and whipped our trees into frenzied motion, flinging small branch debris into the air. We got wet, but the sweeping rain did not fall as heavily in our inland area as we expected. The stream filled to its usual level and the rainwater tanks filled. Personally, we dodged the stormy weather bullet.

Any concern must focus on the plight of people affected elsewhere. The destructive forces of the high-tide sea surges and the storm-driven pounding waves combined to inundate east coast communities and to flood homes and roads. Emergency services media posts, callouts and travel cancellations highlighted the dangerous nature of the storm. Holidaymakers, advised to pack up and go home early, did so. Many people became stranded on the Coromandel Peninsula when the Thames coastal road was destroyed.

Meanwhile, back home, Number 2 Son  anxiously and constantly scrolled social media for storm-damage reports and weather forecasts for the coming days. He and his friend have planned to take their four kids camping next week – on the Coromandel Peninsula.

Many years ago, Himself and I with our two sons, used to camp at Stoney Bay and at Fletchers Bay camps both at Department of Conservation Farm parks. My sister, her husband and their sons joined us. We experienced summer storms. No social media alerts back then. We always prepared for such eventuality. Maybe we were lucky.

Anyway, the next generation is packed and ready. Geeky Grandson cannot believe there is no cellphone coverage where they will camp. He ‘refuses’ to accept the usefulness of packing a notebook and pencil as a basic messaging tool. He looked askance at his outdoorsy, practically-minded younger 11-year old brother who is ecstatic at the prospect of learning how to use his hand-held compass we gave him for Christmas. He is aghast at the prospect of no X-Box, of having to either read the book or play games of cards that his Dad made him pack for entertainment. Even worse, it is cold showers only at the camp. He cannot believe we actually used to enjoy such a camping holiday lifestyle. Undoubtedly there will be more revelations. Oh, how I wish I could be a fly on the tent wall to watch Geeky Grandson adapt from his device driven life to that of simple living and spartan but essential amenities. 

On Sunday, Son and his mate will review the camping situation.  

Always have a Plan B.`And C.